Sandy G.

1) Overlapping: quilt by Caryl Bryer Fallert-Gentry 

2) Transparency: Parabollipses • 49” x 49” • Copyright © 2016 • Caryl Bryer Fallert-Gentry • Bryerpatch Studio • www.bryerpatch.com

her design concept:

This design grew out of a series of sketches I made in Corel Draw, using crescent shapes and ellipses. I chose the colors to create the illusion that the shapes were partially transparent. The shapes were cut from solid colored fabric, many hand-dyed. The background is divided into light in the top right corner and dark in the lower left corner. The patterned, background fabrics are from two of the collections I have designed for Benartex. 

3) another example of transparency giving the illusion of depth. reinforced by the play of bright yellow against the dark green…also by Caryl Bryer Fallert-Gentry

4) Size and Placement and Detail: this photo by Andrew Burr is from the most recent Patagonia catalog….and i think this photograph illustrates the use of size: the cactus in the foreground is full of detail and is large compared to the small kayakers in the river below…your mind knows that the cactus is smaller in real life than people, the photographer achieved depth by using the cactuses in the foreground to frame the kayakers 5) Color: another quilt by Caryl Bryer Fallert-Gentry…this is sort of reverse psychology..i think of deeper as being darker and yet here she leads you into the spiral by using darker colors on the outside and draws the eye into the bright focal point in slightly off center…. seems to me to be a visual expression of “light at the end of the tunnel” 6) Value and detail: the background is darker and the lights the girls are holding are luminous and beaconing to us to step in. they are in a world of their own with the real world way back in the distance. even tho this is an impressionist painting, the suggestion of detail is more pronounced in the foreground.

5) Color: another quilt by Caryl Bryer Fallert-Gentry…this is sort of reverse psychology..i think of deeper as being darker and yet here she leads you into the spiral by using darker colors on the outside and draws the eye into the bright focal point in slightly off center…. seems to me to be a visual expression of “light at the end of the tunnel” 6) Value and detail: the background is darker and the lights the girls are holding are luminous and beaconing to us to step in. they are in a world of their own with the real world way back in the distance. even tho this is an impressionist painting, the suggestion of detail is more pronounced in the foreground.

6) Value and detail: the background is darker and the lights the girls are holding are luminous and beaconing to us to step in. they are in a world of their own with the real world way back in the distance. even tho this is an impressionist painting, the suggestion of detail is more pronounced in the foreground.

(On her site: “Diane Leonard is one of America's most highly respected contemporary impressionists. Raised in Boston, Massachusetts, she has the privilege of being one of only twenty-five members of the Society of American Impressionists. A self-taught artist, her work is exhibited worldwide.”) 7) Another Diane Leonard. I guess the focal point is the closer arm of her chair and her wine glass..or maybe her bright red dress? because of the perspective, we are not in the picture, but it is as if we just walked up and there she was.. the warm cheerful yellow flowers in the lower right are balanced by the flowers in the upper left, and making her seem like she is right where she needs to be! In terms of creating depth, the lighter foreground is closer than the darker background behind her chair… (?) And there is more detail in the foreground…but i don't think this is about a great distance behind her! 8) i promise, this is the last Diane Leonard! she creates depth with the darker foreground and lighter background. and further with the detail on the girl and the dog! that dog is so realistic!  

7) Another Diane Leonard. I guess the focal point is the closer arm of her chair and her wine glass..or maybe her bright red dress? because of the perspective, we are not in the picture, but it is as if we just walked up and there she was.. the warm cheerful yellow flowers in the lower right are balanced by the flowers in the upper left, and making her seem like she is right where she needs to be! In terms of creating depth, the lighter foreground is closer than the darker background behind her chair… (?) And there is more detail in the foreground…but i don't think this is about a great distance behind her!

8) i promise, this is the last Diane Leonard! she creates depth with the darker foreground and lighter background. and further with the detail on the girl and the dog! that dog is so realistic!

9) Value: this is a Latifah Saaffir quilt which uses value to create depth. darker colors at the front; lighter in the back. reinforced with the color chips also darker towards the front.