Gail N.

Ladies Know How to Hold the Jungle Cat by Thornton Dial

In a library search for new artists, I found Thornton Dial. His whimsical watercolors are wonderful and full of meaning.  A small quote from the text: "The masculine counterpart to the feminine in Dials's early drawings is often the tiger. ...the tiger as Dial's alter ego, as powerful, protective, and passionate. The tiger in these iternations resists entrapment through cunning and physical strength and agility, fending off the predations of an unseen larger power. ... In the presence of women the tiger becomes frolicsome, playful, and docile." I chose this as an example of irregular and amorphous elements. The tiger dominates but the other elements are strong, too. 

Dial

Dial

Usha's Quilt by Rayna Gillman 

Gillman

Gillman

This work is carefully constructed with strong horizontal and vertical strips. The dominance of pattern has 2 solid black strips in the center and a black square near the bottom that anchor the riotous color and pattern.  

Nocturne: The Solent by James Abbott McNeill Whistler. No photo can do justice to this painting. How an artist can invoke such a feeling of darkness and loneliness is breathtaking. The dots of orange add just enough feeling of light and occupancy so you wonder what the sailors are doing while they stay off the coast overnight. 

Whistler

Whistler

My work. 

This study shows horizontal lines or set-in slithers contrasting against the vertical strips to draw the eye and create focal points. I took inspiration from Jean Wells and Rayna Gillman. I've been wanting to try this kind of piece. I haven't had time to try anything else. 

Joan Schulze, untitled work 2. I chose this quilt as an example of non-specific abstract elements that create interest as contrasted by the representational A in the lower left. The A, reinforced by the black around it, draws the eye but is balanced by the black on the right. 

Schulze

Schulze

Schulze - 2

Schulze - 2

Wells

Wells

My piece.

My piece.