Faith V.

Part 1:  History

For as long as I can remember I have been fascinated with cloth. Perhaps it was because I was born into a family of makers – sewers, quilters, woodworkers - or because I was wheeled around in fabric stores and fell asleep to the whirring of my mother’s sewing machine when I was very young. From the first time I sat at a sewing machine and made doll dresses in grade school and well into high school when I made my own clothes, sitting and working at a sewing machine came naturally.

In high school I was introduced to drawing, painting, printmaking, and sculpture.  An art major during those years, I lived in the art room (or in the music room as singing is also something I have always enjoyed). Those were rich years!

I married young, spent a few years as a military wife overseas and took my sewing machine where ever I went. During those early married years I created long skirts from jeans, loose fitting tops, and lots of hats. Once kids came along, I created lots of Halloween costumes, pillows, and table runners but little else. 

Then I discovered quilting and this opened up a whole new world to me. I took classes at local fabric stores and learned a variety of techniques and made a few traditional quilts. It was fun but something was missing.

At about this time I felt I needed to return to school to pick up where high school left off.  Taking just a few studio classes at first, one of my teachers encouraged me to apply to be an art major. Best move I ever made! From my local community college, I transferred to Moore College of Art to study textile design. My goal was still to make art quilts, but then I sat down at a loom. 

From that moment on, the focus was on the creation of cloth and a quest to take every class or workshop I could afford.

Part 2: Process

From the planning to the finishing stages, I find all aspects of weaving fascinating. Primarily a cloth weaver (scarves, shawls, and home decor), I often design using a computer program for weaving. I am drawn to woven structures that allow me to create a fabricwith design possibilities on both sides of the cloth such as block weave twills and double weave (weaving two layers of cloth that interconnect).

Incorporating hand painted warp into my weaving is a newer to me technique but one I will be using more often in the future as I love watching the changes of pattern and color as I weave.

I prefer natural fiber yarns using wool, silk, cotton, tencel, and bamboo. I’m moving toward using the most sustainable yarns possible.

Part 3: What do you care about?

I feel fortunate to live in a large city that includes a meandering natural area within its boundaries and minutes from my front door. I am endlessly fascinated by the changing seasons of that natural world as well as the repeating patterns on the facades of tall buildings in the center of the city. My goal is to create cloth that reflects my interpretations of the colors, patterns, and textures of this amazing environment.

More distilling….

Part 1:  History

For as long as I can remember I have been fascinated with cloth. Perhaps it was because I was born into a family of makers – sewers, quilters, and woodworkers.  Or maybe it was because I was wheeled around in fabric stores full of color and pattern, and then falling asleep to the whirring of my mother’s sewing machine before I could talk. When I was old enough, my mother, grandmother, and older sister taught me how to sew and for many years made my own clothes, quilts, and Halloween costumes for my kids. Majoring in art while in high school and a strong interest in art quilts eventually lead me to return to school as an adult and major in textile design. My goal was to make art quilts, but I discovered an even greater passion when I learned how to weave.

Part 2: Process

From the planning to the finishing stages, I find all aspects of weaving fascinating. Primarily a cloth weaver, I often begin the design process using my computer. I am drawn to cloth structures that create double-sided cloth (block weave twills and double cloth) and appreciate the design possibilities these structures provide.

Incorporating hand painted warp into my weaving is a newer to me technique but one I will be using more often in the future as I love watching the changes of pattern and color as I weave.

Part 2: What do you care about?

I feel fortunate to live in a large city that includes a meandering natural area within its boundaries. I am endlessly fascinated by the changing seasons of that natural world as well as the repeating patterns on the facades of buildings in the center of the city. My goal is to create cloth that reflects my interpretations of the colors, patterns, and textures of this amazing environment using natural fibers of wool, silk, cotton, tencel, and bamboo.